Make A Mid-Century Clock From A Wooden Bowl

  • Post category:Crafts

It’s a New Year and a new Thrift Store Decor Upcycle Challenge! We took a few months off for the holidays, but we are back to show you more upcycled thrift ideas! This time we have joined forces with even more bloggers and have tons of thrifty upcycle ideas to get those wheels spinning.

  • Upcycle an item(s) from a thrift store, resale store, or garage sale into a new piece of decor.
  • There’s no monthly theme.
  • There’s no budget to stick to.

Making a Mid-Century clock

I already had a project in mind for our monthly thrift store challenge. I got the idea when I went to the annual Entre Nous Tour of Homes. They always have Elf Alley which is filled with booths of handcrafted items.

But then when I stopped at a garage sale I saw it. I had to have it. A wooden bowl, not just any wooden bowl.

No to me, it looked like a mid-century clock.

I just knew I had to make a mid-century clock from a wooden bowl.

That sounds easy enough so I thought. And it is IF you take into account the shaft of the clock mechanism should be at least a half inch higher than the object you are making the clock from.

Supplies needed:

Off to Hobby Lobby, I went and got the mechanism. The thought going through my mind is this has got to be the easiest project ever.

I decided to clean the wood and leave as is. For the numbers, I used gold metallic wax on oval woodsies. There was going to be four for the 12, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock hours.

I drilled the hole and put it together. There was one problem. It wouldn’t keep the correct time because the washer was too small. I played around with it using some I had around. I figured the shaft of the clock mechanism was too small. Back to Hobby Lobby and I got another one, thinking it was going to work.

No still not right.

OK, I would order a clock mechanism with a taller shaft from Amazon. This one was a little larger but I couldn’t get it to tighten up to the back. I tried it on both sides of the wooden bowl. I was going to get this figured out. The shaft on this clock mechanism was still a little too short. I will use it on another wooden plate I picked up at the same garage sale.

Or maybe something else. But that is for another day.

Time for the big guns. It so happens where I have my booth there is a place that sells and repairs clocks. It is called Somewhere In Time. I stopped by the booth and Charlie found the perfect size clock mechanism with a shaft that clears the shape of the bowl.

And the best part is he gave me the name of the supplier he uses if you need different clock parts like I did to make a mid-century clock from a wooden bowl. By the way, I decided to keep the clean lines of the clock and decided against putting on the number indicators.

What do you think of my mid-century clock?

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How to Make a Little Red Christmas Car Ornament

  • Post category:Crafts

Now those of you who know me know I love to make Christmas Ornaments so I am thrilled to be part of the Ornament Exchange Blog Hop. I especially like using clay pots. I actually have a list of ones I want to design. But when I saw all of the trucks and cars on Pinterest with a Christmas tree on the roof I knew instantly this year’s ornament would be a car. I am going to show you how to make a little red Christmas Car ornament. You can see last year’s Shining Star here and Christmas in July’s Gingerbread Man here.

Alright, let’s get started!

How to make a red Christmas car ornament

Like any tutorial, always good to start by gathering the materials & supplies:

  • 1.5 inch clay pot
  • Hot Glue Gun and Glue (suggested)
  • Red Sculpey
  • Assorted Paint Brushes
  • Christmas Branch Pick
  • Needle Nose Pliers (suggested)
  • Toaster Oven
  • ½ inch crystal beads
  • Black Sharpie
  • 1/8 inch red ribbon
  • Snow Tex
  • 3 ply twine
  • Jingle Bell
  • 5/8 inch silver metallic ribbon (similar)
  • 4-Wooden Buttons
  • 1/4 inch silver ribbon (suggested)
  • Craft Paint (read, white, sparkle, black, & silver!)
  • Square Woodsies
  • Tiny little jewels in red & white

Start by cutting Scupley at indented line. You’ll roll it and then shape it over the large opening of the pot, making sure it fits snugly, creating the car hood. Bake per the directions in the toaster oven.

While the hood bakes paint the pot red. Paint the 4 wooden buttons black. When dry, paint the part with the button holes silver. Cut Scupley at indented line. Roll it and then shape it over the large opening of the pot, making sure it fits snugly, creating the car hood. Bake per the directions in the toaster oven While the hood bakes paint the pot red. Paint the 4 wooden buttons black.

When dry, paint the part with the buttonholes silver. Cut the small Woodsies Squares in half and paint white. This is the license plate

Take the ¼ inch silver ribbon, hot glue it around the edge of the large opening of the pot. You can leave a space because the hood will cover a small part of it.  Glue the hood to the pot covering the area without the silver ribbon. Cut a piece of the 5/8 inch silver metallic ribbon, enough to cover the front of the hood. It is the radiator grill. Hot glue to the hood.

Cut a piece of the ¼ inch silver ribbon and glue to the top of the radiator grill. Glue a piece of the ¼ silver ribbon around the bottom of the hood, covering the edge of the radiator. Glue a bead to each side of the grill. These are the head lights. Glue the license plate to the back over the silver ribbon which is the bumper. Glue the tiny red jewels on either side of the license plate.

Glue the tiny clear jewel on the top of the red one. Glue the button wheels at the seam where the hood is glued to the pot and towards the back.

Final steps:

  1. Using the sparkle paint, paint the windshield, side windows and rear window. When the paint is dry use the Sharpie and draw an outline around the painted areas to highlight the windows and doors.
  2. Use the wire pliers, clip a small piece of the Christmas Tree pick, about an inch
  3. Cut a length of the 1/8 inch red ribbon and thread the bell through. Pull the ribbon up through the pot so the ends are on the top and the bell is inside the pot. Dab some hot glue on the tip of the cut branch and put a piece of twine on it. Wrap and glue to mimic a burlap sack. Glue the Christmas tree to the top of the pot. Be careful and make sure the red ribbon is held down on either side.
  4. Tie a bow with the red ribbon around the Christmas tree. Dab snow tex on top of the tree, wheels, and headlights and the back of the car.

Is this not the cutest little clay pot ornament? Every year I say this is my favorite but this is one of my favorites. And that is How to Make a Little Red Christmas Car Ornament. My partner is Emily of Two Purple Couches. I can’t wait to get her creation, I love handcrafted ornaments.

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